• Cheam, Worcester Park and Selsdon, Surrey

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Free Your Sciatic Nerve

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Sciatica is a very treatable problem. In most cases a short course of treatments is all that is needed to remove sciatic pain. Having released any trapped nerve, we can promote a good, healthy environment so natural healing can occur much more rapidly.
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Free Your Nerve

Can we treat your sciatic pain?

Our experienced Osteopaths at our Worcester Park, Selsdon and Cheam, Sutton, Surrey clinics successfully treat all types of sciatica and nerve pain on a regular basis. In most cases, a short course of 4-6 treatments is all that is required to deal with sciatic pain. The common cause of this pain is nerve compression in the lower back or buttocks.

Trapped or compressed nerves in the lumbar spine are freed with the use of traction, articulation and manipulation techniques. Nerves that are trapped in the buttock muscles are released with massage, stretches and exercises. In some cases, the tight buttock muscles are a result of the body compensating for dropped arches in the feet, and in these instances, orthotic insoles can be prescribed to correct this.

So, what gets on your nerves?

Orthotic treatment for sciatica

As mentioned above, orthotics are often prescribed to resolve sciatic pain. They do this by correcting dropped arches in the feet. Dropped arches lead to the legs and knees medially rotating (twisting inwards), which can lead to knee pain, but always affects the way the leg functions. The body automatically compensates to correct this by using the buttock muscles (gluteal muscles) to rotate the leg laterally (twist outwards). It is when these gluteal muscles are constantly used they become over-tight and trap the sciatic nerve, leading to what is called Piriformis Syndrome (a type of sciatica).

What is sciatica and what are the symptoms?

The term sciatica has become used to describe pain in the back of the leg, buttock or foot, resulting from a trapped nerve. In many cases, it is not the sciatic nerve, but one of many that travel in that area. The symptoms often gradually increase or occur more regularly as the condition progresses.

  • Lower back or buttock pain that leads to shooting pain in the back of the leg and foot
  • Leg pain that can make it difficult to walk or stand
  • Pain in the buttocks or back of the leg when sitting in chairs or cars
3d rendered illustration - sciatic nerve
Dear Michael
A quick note of praise for your continued excellent service. I always feel welcome and relaxed when I visit the surgery and the attention to detail before any actual treatment commences, the assessment puts my mind at rest that you are not just going through the motions of a standard practise but you are treating me as an individual case. Obviously, the treatment works, with a degree of success that always surpasses my expectations and I have no hesitation in recommending your services.
Yours sincerely
Mr S Parker
Rowcolour

Will pain-relieving drugs help with my sciatica?

Inflammation can be greatly reduced with the use of NSAID (Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs), such as ibuprofen, aspirin and paracetamol. Although they can reduce the inflammation caused by your sciatica, they do not address the underlying problem. They can, in some cases, cause stomach problems, such as acid reflux and constipation.

It is important not to use painkilling drugs before engaging in a physical activity. This is because, without the feedback from your body’s nervous system, it is easy to over-use and further aggravate your sciatic condition. However, they are very useful in helping you get a good night’s sleep, which is a vitally important part for your recovery.

If you are already taking medication prescribed by a doctor, you should always ask the advice of a Doctor or Pharmacist before self-medicating, as some pain killing drugs can affect the effectiveness of your medication, and can sometimes be dangerous.

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